- banner1
+ | -

CITIES IN THE 21st CENTURY: A Primer

Book Review

John Matthew Barlow reviews John Lorinc's new book, Cities: A Groundwork Guide. Last year marked the first time that the majority of the world's population lived in cities; Lorinc's introduction to the subject offers a timely, and lively, critique of the issues confronting cities and humanity as a whole as we confront this radical restructuring of our way of living in the urban century.

Read more...

  • Cities: A Guide

    Book Review

    John Matthew Barlow reviews John Lorinc's new book, Cities: A Groundwork Guide. Last year marked the first time that the majority of the world's population lived in cities; Lorinc's introduction to the subject offers a timely, and lively, critique of the issues confronting cities and humanity as a whole as we confront this radical restructuring of our way of living in the urban century.

    Read more...

  • The Hurt Locker

    Review

    Eric Randolph reviews Kathryn Bigelow's The Hurt Locker, and notes a shift in film-making sensibilities from the war-as-heroics paradigm of earlier Hollywood, towards the everyman's war-as-hell model that has now lodged itself in Western cultural consciousness.

    Read...

  • Architecture & Biopolitics

    Interview

    Berlin-based writer Daniel Miller's October 2008 interview with Swedish philosopher and SITE Magazine Editor-In-Chief Sven-Olov Wallenstein, on his new book Biopolitics and the Emergence of Modern Architecture (Princeton Architectural Press, 2009).

    Read...

  • Wired For War

    Symposium

    The second symposium in CTlab's 2009 series, focused on Peter Singer's new book, Wired For War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century (Penguin Press: 2009), ran from 30 March to 2 April. Singer and half a dozen scholars from the U.S., Canada, the U.K., and Austria debated the use and ethics of robots in war.

    Read...

  • DEFCON 17

    Current Intelligence

    Tim Stevens reports back from the DEFCON 17 conference in Las Vegas: are hackers thinking meat isn't just meat anymore?

    Read...

CONTRIBUTORS

Editor: Michael A. Innes // posts // web
Contributor: Matthew Barlow // posts // web
Contributor: Christopher Albon // posts // web
Contributor: Charli Carpenter // posts // web
Contributor: Bradley Evans // posts // web
Contributor: Eric Randolph // posts // web
Contributor: Tim Stevens // posts // web
Contributor: Marisa Urgo // posts // web
Alumni: Kenneth Anderson // Marc Tyrrell

From the Bookstore
Comments
Wednesday
06Jan2010

Where's Kashmir in the Afghan Debate?

It's interesting to see how successfully India has managed to have Kashmir removed from the discourse about Afghanistan and Pakistan. There is quite a bit of talk about India getting more forcefully involved in Afghanistan and also some worryingly chest-thumping advice being put forward about direct strikes on Pakistan militants.

In today's Guardian comment section, I argue that India's real focus should be finding a way to deal with Pakistan's neuroses, in particular by re-engaging on the Kashmir issue, since this is one of the fundamental causes of problems in the region. In case I don't make it clear, tackling neurosis probably does not involve blowing anything up.

Read the article here...

Reader Comments (2)

What is always surprising to me about Kashmir in the Indian debate is that it has surprisingly little resonance amongst the rest of India's not insubstantial Muslim population.

Jan 18, 2010 at 0:08 | Unregistered CommenterRaff

That's a very interesting point, Raff, and not something I've really thought about properly before. The issue certainly seems to have remained a nationalist one rather than something that plays on the religious tensions within India. I wonder whether that impression is correct, or whether it's something that is not often commented upon in the media, or whether it reflects the fact that only the elite (which cuts across religious divides) really get animated about. Something to look into, so thanks for that...

Jan 18, 2010 at 12:45 | Registered CommenterEric Randolph

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
|
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>