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CITIES IN THE 21st CENTURY: A Primer

Book Review

John Matthew Barlow reviews John Lorinc's new book, Cities: A Groundwork Guide. Last year marked the first time that the majority of the world's population lived in cities; Lorinc's introduction to the subject offers a timely, and lively, critique of the issues confronting cities and humanity as a whole as we confront this radical restructuring of our way of living in the urban century.

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  • Cities: A Guide

    Book Review

    John Matthew Barlow reviews John Lorinc's new book, Cities: A Groundwork Guide. Last year marked the first time that the majority of the world's population lived in cities; Lorinc's introduction to the subject offers a timely, and lively, critique of the issues confronting cities and humanity as a whole as we confront this radical restructuring of our way of living in the urban century.

    Read more...

  • The Hurt Locker

    Review

    Eric Randolph reviews Kathryn Bigelow's The Hurt Locker, and notes a shift in film-making sensibilities from the war-as-heroics paradigm of earlier Hollywood, towards the everyman's war-as-hell model that has now lodged itself in Western cultural consciousness.

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  • Architecture & Biopolitics

    Interview

    Berlin-based writer Daniel Miller's October 2008 interview with Swedish philosopher and SITE Magazine Editor-In-Chief Sven-Olov Wallenstein, on his new book Biopolitics and the Emergence of Modern Architecture (Princeton Architectural Press, 2009).

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  • Wired For War

    Symposium

    The second symposium in CTlab's 2009 series, focused on Peter Singer's new book, Wired For War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century (Penguin Press: 2009), ran from 30 March to 2 April. Singer and half a dozen scholars from the U.S., Canada, the U.K., and Austria debated the use and ethics of robots in war.

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  • DEFCON 17

    Current Intelligence

    Tim Stevens reports back from the DEFCON 17 conference in Las Vegas: are hackers thinking meat isn't just meat anymore?

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Thursday
14Jan2010

Dr. Bradley Evans Joins CTlab

The Complex Terrain Laboratory just got a whole lot smarter... Dr. Brad Evans, a colleague in the School of Politics and International Studies (POLIS), at the University of Leeds, is joining CTlab. Brad is a political theorist and Lecturer in Global Terror (how's that for  a handle!?!) at POLIS, as well as founder/curator of the nascent Histories of Violence project. He'll be contributing to Current Intelligence, CTlab's current affairs blog, and participating in other CTlab funnies as they come up. Here's a snippet from his faculty bio:

I am a political theorist specialising in the fields of terror, governance, and political violence. My work is particularly interested in exploring 1) the contemporary nature of terror, especially the divine role terror has assumed within the Liberal imaginary 2) the depoliticizing nature of Liberal forms of governance 3) the imperial nature of Kantian thought 4) the re-problematisation of violence in today’s post-Clausewitzean world 5) the shift in security discourses and practices towards event based thinking 6) the critical relevance of the works of Giorgio Agamben, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault and Paul Virilio to global politics and international affairs.

Welcome, Brad!

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