- banner1
+ | -

THE HURT LOCKER: A New Kind of War Movie

The Review

Eric Randolph reviews Kathryn Bigelow's The Hurt Locker, and notes a shift in film-making sensibilities from the war-as-heroics paradigm of earlier Hollywood, towards the everyman's war-as-hell model that has now lodged itself in Western cultural consciousness.

Read more...

  • The Hurt Locker

    The Review

    Eric Randolph reviews Kathryn Bigelow's The Hurt Locker, and notes a shift in film-making sensibilities from the war-as-heroics paradigm of earlier Hollywood, towards the everyman's war-as-hell model that has now lodged itself in Western cultural consciousness.

    Read more...

  • The Occidental Guerrilla

    Book Review

    Michael A. Innes reviews David Kilcullen's new book The Accidental Guerrilla: Fighting Small Wars in the Midst of a Big One. A timely and astute synthesis of experience, research and analysis, the author pinpoints the political shear between minority existential threats to US interests and the majority of the world's locally invested guerrillas who just want to be left alone.

    Read...

  • Architecture & Biopolitics

    Interview

    Berlin-based writer Daniel Miller's October 2008 interview with Swedish philosopher and SITE Magazine Editor-In-Chief Sven-Olov Wallenstein, on his new book Biopolitics and the Emergence of Modern Architecture (Princeton Architectural Press, 2009).

    Read...

  • Wired For War

    Symposium

    The second symposium in CTlab's 2009 series, focused on Peter Singer's new book, Wired For War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century (Penguin Press: 2009), ran from 30 March to 2 April. Singer and half a dozen scholars from the U.S., Canada, the U.K., and Austria debated the use and ethics of robots in war.

    Read...

  • DEFCON 17

    Current Intelligence

    Tim Stevens reports back from the DEFCON 17 conference in Las Vegas: are hackers thinking meat isn't just meat anymore?

    Read...

 

Stand by...

Entries in diplomacy (7)

Wednesday
29Jul2009

The Cold War in the Arctic

In 1949, the Soviet Union parachuted two scientists, Vitali Volovich and Andrei Medvedev, onto the surface of the North Pole in a bit of Cold War one-upsmanship with Canada. Next spring, Russia plans to celebrate a belated 60th anniversary of the event by conducting a paratroop drop at the North Pole.

The entire Arctic region is tense these days with competing national claims to the seabed (full of oil) and the fate of the waters within the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, the fabled Northwest Passage. Should the waters of the passage melt, a new shipping route will be opened up, one that is cheaper and faster, in terms of the North American and East Asian markets, than the Panama Canal. The question of who owns the waters, then, becomes crucial

Click to read more ...

Friday
03Jul2009

NATO's Strategic Concept

The Strategic Concept is a big deal, but it's only as good as its later interpretation and implementation. That means the "intellectual exercise" needs be sufficiently grounded, robust and comprehensive to enable Allied Command Operations (ACO) - the military pragmatists who actually run NATO operations - to get on with their jobs. As with the previous two iterations, I don't expect that this round of wanking discussion will result in any great changes. That said, there have been a few small changes in geopolitics in the intervening years

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
01Jul2009

American Imperialism in the Obama Era

David Bromwich has published an article in the New York Review of Books that is ostensibly a comparative review of two recent works on American imperialism. The first is Leslie H. Gelb's, Power Rules: How Common Sense Can Rescue American Foreign Policy; the second is Obama's Cairo speech.  Each lays out a model for American foreign policy and, therefore, says Bromwich, American imperialism.  

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
17Jun2009

It Wasn't The Plan, It Was The Implementation...

SHAIKH SHAHZAID CAMP, Pakistan -- U.S. envoy Richard C. Holbrooke, red-faced and sweaty, sat on the dirt floor of a stifling tent as Aslam Khan, a 38-year-old laborer, spoke haltingly of his family's panicked flight from a Pakistani army offensive against Taliban forces in their mountain village, three hours north of here.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
10Jun2009

Aussie Troops vs. Dutch Food

Napoleon Bonaparte said “an army marches on its stomach”. This might be true, but for Australian troops in Afghanistan some food works better than others. Last week the Australian government dispatched a special team of military cooks to prepare Australian cuisine after widespread complaints by their troops about the Dutch-run mess at their base. Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston told Australian lawmakers: “I think the issue is that it's not Aussie food, it's European food. It's true that people have been quite strong in their

Click to read more ...