- banner1
+ | -

The Contested Landscape Of Jerusalem

The Review

John Matthew Barlow discusses University of Tel Aviv archeologist Raphael Greenberg's new research on the dig at Wadi Hilweh, and its political and cultural ramifications for Israelis and Palestinians.

Read more...

  • Contested Jerusalem

    Research

    John Matthew Barlow discusses University of Tel Aviv archeologist Raphael Greenberg's new research on the dig at Wadi Hilweh, and its political and cultural ramifications for Israelis and Palestinians.

    Read more...

  • The Occidental Guerrilla

    Book Review

    Michael A. Innes reviews David Kilcullen's new book The Accidental Guerrilla: Fighting Small Wars in the Midst of a Big One. A timely and astute synthesis of experience, research and analysis, the author pinpoints the political shear between minority existential threats to US interests and the majority of the world's locally invested guerrillas who just want to be left alone.

    Read...

  • Architecture & Biopolitics

    Interview

    Berlin-based writer Daniel Miller's October 2008 interview with Swedish philosopher and SITE Magazine Editor-In-Chief Sven-Olov Wallenstein, on his new book Biopolitics and the Emergence of Modern Architecture (Princeton Architectural Press, 2009).

    Read...

  • Wired For War

    Symposium

    The second symposium in CTlab's 2009 series, focused on Peter Singer's new book, Wired For War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century (Penguin Press: 2009), ran from 30 March to 2 April. Singer and half a dozen scholars from the U.S., Canada, the U.K., and Austria debated the use and ethics of robots in war.

    Read...

  • The Limits Of "Security"

    Current Intelligence

    Kenneth Anderson explores the link between international financial instability and global security in response to Judy Shelton's recent Wall Street Journal op-ed.

    Read...

 

Entries in Islam (3)

Wednesday
17Jun

The Contested Landscape of Jerusalem

To call Jerusalem a disputed location would be an understatement.  The Temple Mount might be the most hotly contested piece of real estate on the planet, sacred as it is to the three major western religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Archaeologists believe that there has been a city on the site of Jerusalem since about 2600 BCE, meaning that for nearly 5000 years, various groups of people have fought over the landscape: Judeans, Israelites, Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Seleucids, Jews, Romans, Christians, Europeans, Muslims, imperialists, occupiers, resisters.

Click to read more ...

Friday
24Apr

Fighting Terrorism with Values

In Britain, the discourse about terrorism has increasingly revolved around issues related to the assimilation of foreigners, particularly Muslims, into British society, cheerled by a shrieking right-wing press. Last night, anti-extremist think tank The Quilliam Foundation held their 1st anniversary in central London with a panel discussion entitled ‘What do Britons have in Common?’ The question is: does this debate really reach the people that it needs to reach, or is it just reinforcing the alienation that leads people down radical paths?

Click to read more ...

Sunday
18Jan

On Structuring Muslim Space and the Ears of Fish

The black granite Ka’ba, the cubical structure that stands as the holiest center of Islam, features at its eastern vertex a small black stone about the size of a grapefruit, the al-hajar al-aswad, which may or may not have fallen to earth in the time of Adam and Eve. Supported in a silver frame, this obsidian-like cipher structures space for some billion Muslims, standing as it does at the culminating point known as the qibla, the direction to which devout followers of Mohammed address their five daily obeisances.

Click to read more ...